STUDY GUIDE 2018/2019 -TILBURG

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Content

During a course of 7 lectures students will be introduced to the discipline of Landscape Architecture and learn from current trends and approaches, a brief history of the discipline and its linkages to public space design, energy landscapes and urban agriculture. A number of professional landscape architects will talk about their work and reflect on how they see the role of landscape design in addressing current challenges such as sustainability, climate change, social and economic inequalities etc.

 The goal of the lectures is to get inspired by interesting approaches from designers from adjacent fields, close to architecture and urban design. Can students in architecture or urban design possibly be influenced by ideas, concepts and strategies, discovered in the field of landscape architecture, in developing their architectural ideas?

Program:

- 28 August - Jan Maas

- 4 September - Jan Maas

- 11 September - Marieke Berkers

- 18 September - Marieke Berkers

- 25 September - Marieke Berkers

- 2 October - Saline Verhoeven

- 9 October - Saline Verhoeven

Lectures

1. Design matters (Jan Maas. Boom Landscape Architects, Amsterdam): Craftmanship, material and technique in landscape architecture

2. New localism (Jan Maas. Boom Landscape Architects, Amsterdam): How to design with local cultural-, geographical-, topographical, ecological-, phenomena's and conditions

 

Marieke Berkers continues with three lectures that offer an introduction to the historical developments in landscape architecture. The course covers relevant developments in the theory and practice of landscape architecture. The discipline will be approached in its relationship with culture and nature, socio-political developments, planning and (scientific) research. Concrete examples of realized projects make the theory insightful.

 

1 The limits of the discipline

The first lecture offers a meeting with the historical actors in landscape architecture. To do this, we first cross the ocean to the US, where at the end of the 19th century the landscape architects presented themselves for the first time as a distinct discipline, alongside architecture and landscape gardening. The discipline developed quickly and its field grew. Also in the Netherlands in the 20th century, mainly because of the changing tasks in the city and the landscape: making healthy living environments, giving place to food production, making new land, conquering water and generate energy.

 

2 The Vocation of Care

In this lecture we’ll jump over the walls of the enclosed Medieval gardens into Renaissance gardens where the garden, the house, and the landscape were seen as one ongoing, connected system. We’ll continue our ‘grand tour’ via Baroque, English and Modernist gardens to our contemporary tiny private front gardens. We’ll see that historically the status of gardens in society and the role of the client have been strongly connected to the cultural-political context in which gardens were designed. Also an awareness of working with living matter and changing attitudes towards planting will rise.

 

3 Urban landscapes

This lecture will shine light on the distinctive roles landscape architects played in designing urban landscapes during the last two centuries. We will debate the tension and possibilities of cooperation between different disciplines (architects, urbanists and landscape architects) operating in the urban field. We’ll explore socio-political and cultural changes in the last centuries - the changing way we looked at cities as (un)healthy environments, the changing way we understand the effect of design on men, flora and fauna and vice versa. We’ll look at projects like Ebenezer Howard’s Garden City, De Kern Gezond of B+B and the vertical ‘forests’ of Stefano Boeri.

 

Saline Verhoeven finalizes the series of lectures with two lectures.

 

The shaping of the landscape

"Now and in the future jobs will travel towards people and not any longer people towards jobs” (Jack Kardys, Director Parks, Recreation and Open spaces Miami-Dade County)

With this statement Jack Kardys emphasized that offering quality of life is an important factor in the competition between metropolitan areas. In the study Blind Spot-metropolitan landscape in the global battle for talent Stichting Deltametropool reaches the same conclusion. At the same time they state that "the quality of metropolitan landscapes is a blind spot for many regional economic strategies".

With examples from the Ijsselmeer and other examples of metropolitan landscapes around the world Saline Verhoeven will illustrate the role of design in shaping the landscape, engaging cultural heritage and contributing to quality of live. And elaborate on how drawing can be used as a research tool at the regional level.

 

Designing for City-Region Foodscapes

The question 'how do we feed a growing urban population in a sustainable and healthy way' is one of the biggest social and scientific issues at the moment. The current food supply system roughly determines half of the city's ecological footprint, out of 7 billion people on earth has between 2 and 3 billion diet-related health problems (over 1 billion are overweight and obese, 800 million are hungry, over 1 billion (chronic) malnourished) and 18% of all greenhouse gas emissions are caused by agriculture. Climate change will have a huge impact on food supply (agricultural productivity, crop failures, distribution problems), but can also contribute to reducing and dealing with climate change, and so on.

Saline Verhoeven will explain five socio-spatial design principles for designing future-proof city-region foodscapes. She will present examples from the book Flourishing Foodscapes (Han Wiskerke, Saline Verhoeven, expected sep. 2018) published by Valiz, Amsterdam.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LITERATURE

- Robert Pogue Harrison, Gardens. An Essay on the Human Condition, Chicago, 2008.

- Clemens Steenbergen, Wouter Reh, Architecture and Landscape: The Design Experiment of the Great European Gardens and Landscapes, 2003

-  Marinke Steenhuis en Fransje Hooimeijer (red.), Maakbaar Landschap, Nederlandse landschapsarchitectuur 1945-1970, NAi Publishers 2009.

- Marinke Steenhuis, Overbodig zondebesef: de emancipatie van de naoorlogse landschapsarchitectuur, Bijhouwerlezing, Wageningen, 2014.

- Piet Vollaard, Jacques Vink, Niels de Zwarte, Making Urban Nature, Rotterdam, 2017.

 

 

RESULTS

Students are participating in the course by attending the lectures and by debating on topics brought forward by the tutors.

 

EXAMINATION

Will be discussed during classes

 

 

OBJECTIVES

SKILLS:

The aim of this course is to provide a historical framework and a basic repertoire for the students. Students can use the historical framework to determine their own position in relation to the design traditions in landscape architecture. The repertoire can be used as a tool to interpret, evaluate and work with (historical) designs and ideas. The course also provides an understanding of the value of apprehension of history and historical research for today’s designers.

 

List of course objectives, numbered (1,2,3 …):

 1. ability to reflect on connection between landscape architecture and architecture/urbanism

 2. ability to position trends and themes from the field of landscape architecture in relation to one’s own discipline

 3. ability to reflect on interdisciplinary crossovers and their benefits

 4. Connecting knowledge of the history of architecture to their daily practice of a designer

4. Knowledge of historical and contemporary landscape architecture practices and able to connect to their daily practice of a designer

 

 

COMPETENCES

DESIGN, Level 2

RESEARCH, Level 2

 

 

 

Academic year

Course name

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Study year

Period

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Examinations

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EU Qualifications

2018-2019

landscape

2

1

 

7

Marieke Berkers, Jan Maas en Saline Verhoeven

Attend classes and participate in discussion

lectures

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