STUDY GUIDE 2018/2019 -TILBURG

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architecture

year

1

2

3

4

period 1

period 2

period 3

period 4

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art & culture

economics

architecture 3

media 3

core 3

research 2

critical thinking 2

worldschool

fabrication

fabrication

out of the box

society

society

wildcard

eco(nomo)logies

eco(nomo)logies

impact

winterschool 3

practice portfolio 3

portfolio 3

sustainable design

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Academic year

Course name

Ects

Study year

Period

Sessions

 

 

Tutors

Examinations

Work form

EU Qualifications

2018-2019

ECONOMICS

2

3

2

7 weeks, Tuesdays from 19:30-21:30 pm

 

SIEBE VOOGT

KNOWLEDGE ASSESSMENT

LECTURES

b

 

 

 

 

CONTENT

For the first time in history, more than half of the global population lives in cities. At the same time, aided by new technologies and contemporary modes of transport, the economic relations within cities have changed dramatically. These economic shifts are not only changing our financial situation, but also have a profound impact on the distribution of wealth, accessibility and the environment, both within the urban tissue and on a global scale.

In this course, we will investigate the forces that drive these changes and look for insights how to approach this topic as a designer of the future. The series is set up as a conversation with the students. Starting from a theoretical base, we will critically analyze and discuss the different topics in our meetings. We will use real-life examples to illustrate the theoretical framework provided in the course.

 

The lectures will contain the following topics:

1. Principles. Introduction to key economic principles related to architecture and urbanism. After the break a screening of excerpts from films depicting possible future cities.

2. The Rules of the Game. What rules and regulations shape the city and how to these frame the economic relations within the city? Do these rules provide for a fair game? Do different types of ownership (public, private and common) create different cities?

3. Life in the City. Who owns the city and who decides how it is made? Are people free in their choice how and where to live and work? An analysis of the economic aspects of urban living and the impact it has on the environment.

4. Shop till you drop. The history of commerce and tourism within the urban fabric and the impact it has on its vitality.

5. The Winner takes it all. Over the last decades, cities have become increasingly segregated. Based on the knowledge gained in the course so far, we try to analyze this issue, both locally and globally.

6. Big Data, Smart Cities and the City of the Future. The (non-)sense of designi based on data input. How can we make sure that in the city of the future there is room for everyone?

7. Synthesis: Your City of the Future. For the final meeting students are asked to describe their City of the Future based on its economic relations. We will exchange ideas and review each others work.

Each meeting will consist of  a short lecture to provide a theoretical framework. Based on this, we will look at some examples and engage in a discussion on the topic at hand. Each meeting consists of two blocks of 45 minutes, with a 15 minute break in between.

 

 

LITERATURE

A selection of texts and other material to prepare for the meetings will be distributed via email and on intranet.

 

RESULTS

The course provides the students with insights in economic principles and processes related to the design of cities. These principles are illustrated with international projects and some own work. Students are participating in the course by reading literature, by debating the different topics and by doing their examination.

 

EXAMINATION

To examine the students’ personal development during the course and their ability to transfer ideas into their work as designer, the students will be asked to describe their city of the future based on the economic relations it inhabits. They are free to chose any medium to communicate their ideas, as long as it is not the traditional set of architectural drawings.

 

OBJECTIVES

List of course objectives, numbered (1,2,3 …):

 

1. ability to reflect on wider socio-economic trends and their impacts on cities and architectural practice

 

2. learning to understand the urban context in a multi-layered way

 

3. being able to debate on current urban challenges and their global and local impacts

 

4. showing skills of writing and argumentation

 

COMPETENCES

RESEARCH, Level 1