STUDY GUIDE 2018/2019 -TILBURG

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architecture

year

1

2

3

4

period 1

period 2

period 3

period 4

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landscape

architecture 2

urbanism 2

media 2

core 2

research 1

critical thinking 1

worldschool

fabrication

fabrication

out of the box

society

society

wildcard

eco(nomo)logies

eco(nomo)logies

impact

winterschool 2

practice portfolio 2

portfolio 2

sustainable design

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Academic year

Course name

Ects

Study year

Period

Sessions

 

 

 

 

Tutors

Examinations

Work form

 

EU Qualifications

2017-2018

CRITICAL THINKING 1&2

2, 2

2, 3

3, 4

9 weeks, Friday from 09:00 – 11:30

19, 26 January 02, 09, 23, February, 02, 09, 16, 23 March, 06 April

Dr.ir. Leslie Kavanaugh

Class Participation and Essay

Lectures, Workshop, and Discussion

b,e,f,g

 

CONTENT

CHANGING FIELDS:  Architecture has chiefly been considered as a static object.  However, due to various cultural and technological forces, how can we begin to think of architecture as something responsive, adaptive, and morphological?  In this series of Critical Thinking I & II, we will be exploring various ways to think about Changing Fields in Architecture; including reading Aristotle, Heraclitus, Whitehead, Darwin/Wallace/Gould, Bergson, and Leibniz.

The theme of change can be thought of in various ways; among others, disposition in space, metamorphosis, process evolving over time, and probability as opposed to certainty.

 

• The Nature of Time (and Space):  What are time and space? Certainly, many theories have historically been put forward.  We will explore what it means to think of time and space – not as a container for (architectural) objects – but as a spatio-temporal relation.

• Evolution and Adaptation:  Darwin famously identified theoretically the mechanisms for change in species as variation and natural selection.  The other side of the question was the environmental impulse and response to the organism.  What are the consequences for architecture when the environment can be manipulated for better or worse to the impact of all species?

• Morphogenesis:  Literally meaning creating or changing form or shape, can architecture be thought of as not a static object but a changing, responsive, and indeed adaptive interaction, identifying the critical parameters for iterations?

• Movement and Impermanence:  Pevsner famously said that a bicycle shed is a building; Lincoln cathedral is architecture.  Yet most of what we design as architects and urbanists will not survive us.  Can we think of architecture as something nomadic?  As wearable?  As transferable to other functions over time as History?

• Theories of Ecology and Sustainability:  Buckminister Fuller wrote a famous book in the sixties entitled “Spaceship Earth”. Yet in spite of a strong ecological movement in the twentieth century, we still think of human being as something other than animals, other than part and parcel of the earth as a whole.  This standpoint has consequence in how we approach our environment.  Can we think of a sustainable architecture that also is about the people who care for it?

• Being and Becoming/Immutability or Process?  At the foundation of our interactions with our world as architects and urbanists, are the metaphysical presuppositions of a stable, lawful, and eternally present world.  Yet even Heraclitus in the 5th century BC, proposed that everything was constantly changing in its forms of energy.  Can we begin now to think of the implications of “Changing Fields” as something more to do with Evolution, Process, and Probability?

 

 

 

LITERATURE

Kavanaugh, Leslie; Chrono-topologies: Hybrid Spatialities and Multiple Temporalities (Leiden: Brill, 2010).  Copies available for twenty euros on the first day of class.

 Other literature specific to the individual’s topic.

 

RESULTS

A scholarly essay of five pages exploring the theme of “Changing Fields”.

 

EXAMINATION  The students are required to deliver a (hard and digital) copy of their essay as well as to present their findings to the class.

 

OBJECTIVES

• To Think Critically!

• To Formulate a well-articulated Question

• To comply with standards of scientific scholarship

• To coherently argue a thesis

• To lay the foundation for a design concept

 

COMPETENCES

Research – Level 2 & 3, Communication – Level 2 & 3

 

WEEKLY SCHEDULE

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