STUDY GUIDE 2018/2019 -TILBURG

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Academic year

Course name

Ects

Study year

Period

Sessions

 

 

 

 

Tutors

Examinations

 

Work form

EU Qualifications

2018-2019

Architecture 2

2

2

2

7 weeks, Tuesday from 19:30 – 21:30

31 October

7,14,21,28 November

5, 12 December

Margit van Schaik

Essay - Reflection on the literature that is used

Lectures, discussion

b

 

 

 

CONTENT

“To read well requires one to develop one’s thinking about reading and, as a result, to learn how to engage in the process of what we call close reading. Students not only need to learn how to determine whether a text is worth reading, but also how to take ownership of a text’s important ideas (when it contains them). This requires the active use of intellectual skills. It requires command of the theory of close reading as well as guided practice based on that theory. “

 

http://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/critical-thinking-the-art-of-close-reading-part-one/509

 

The language of modern architecture consisted of words such as ‘form, function, space, design, order, structure’  ; at present these words have been replaced by ‘geometries, urgency, networking, strategy, generic, innovation’ and many more.

This replacement illustrates a shift in the discipline’s concern. The language of Modern Architecture communicated within reasonably defined physical boundaries, engaged with the production of objects as finite product, and a relation with philosophy and the arts. It reflected a world that could be ordered and structured, a context related to history, transparent and true.

While, the present language represents a discipline defining itself as an abstract field of action, discusses processes, and is anchored in economics and politics. Contemporary architecture is part of a world of multiplicity - it operates globally and is subjected to accelerating changes and developments.

Architecture’s present vocabulary cannot but encompass change, replacing the permanent with the variable and therefore addressing the system and not the object, the temporary and not the constant, the ephemeral and not the solid.

 

In this theory course students will “close read” and try to link text with the built reality.

 

 

 

LITERATURE

tba

 

RESULTS

Students are participating in the course by reading literature, by debating on topics brought forward and by writing an essay.

 

EXAMINATION

Knowledge assessment by means of presentation.

1. Reflection on a chozen text in relation to realized projects.

2. Reflection on the used literature.

 

OBJECTIVES

• ability to reflect on knowledge of history, ways of writing history and literature

• (adequate) knowledge of architecture history and literature on a chozen topic

•  understanding strategies and ways of writing and creating history

• sdeveloping skills of writing and argumentation

• connecting knowledge architecture history to the daily practice of a designer

 

 

COMPETENCES

Research, Level 2

Communicating, Level 2